Profile and Review of WHO, World Health Organization

 Full Profile of WHO, World Health Organization

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What organization is WHO?  

The World Health Organization (WHO) is the specialized agency of the United Nations responsible for international public health. 

The WHO constitution states its ultimate goal as "the achievement by all persons of the highest possible level of health". Headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, it has six regional offices and 150 field offices worldwide.

WHO Task

The World Health Organization (WHO) is a specialized agency of the United Nations that is responsible for international public health. The organization has a wide range of tasks and responsibilities that are designed to promote and protect the health of people around the world.

One of WHO's key tasks is to provide leadership and guidance on global health issues. The organization works closely with governments, health professionals, and other stakeholders to develop evidence-based policies and strategies that promote health equity and improve public health outcomes.

Another important task of WHO is to provide technical assistance and support to countries in need. This can take the form of providing training and education to health workers, helping to strengthen health systems, and supporting countries in responding to public health emergencies.

In addition to its work on global health issues, WHO also plays a critical role in setting and enforcing international health standards. The organization develops and monitors guidelines and regulations related to a wide range of health issues, including disease prevention and control, nutrition, and environmental health.

Overall, WHO's tasks are vast and varied, and reflect the organization's commitment to promoting and protecting the health of people around the world. With its global reach, expertise, and dedication to public health, WHO is well-positioned to continue making a positive impact on the health and well-being of communities around the world.


WHO Profile 

WHO was formed 7 April 1948; 74 years ago Types of specialized agencies of the United Nations Active official status WHO headquarters are in Geneva, Switzerland Chief Tedros Adhanom (Director General) Budget $7.96 billion (2020–2021) The WHO website is www.who.int WHO was founded on April 7, 1948. The first meeting of the World Health Assembly (WHA), the agency's governing body, took place on July 24 of that year. 

WHO includes the assets, personnel and duties of the League of Nations Health Organization and the International Office d'Hygi√®ne Publique, including the International Classification of Diseases (ICD). His work began in earnest in 1951 after a significant infusion of financial and technical resources. The World Health Assembly (WHA) is the legislative and supreme body of WHO. 

Based in Geneva, it usually meets annually in May. It appoints a director-general every five years and votes on WHO policy and financial matters, including its proposed budget. It also reviews the executive board's reports and decides whether any areas of work require further scrutiny. The assembly elects 34 members, technically qualified in the health field, to serve on the executive board for a three-year term. 

The main functions of the WHO council are to implement the decisions and policies of the Assembly, advise and facilitate its work. As of May 2021, the chairman of the executive board is Dr. Patrick Amoth from Kenya


History of the WHO 

During the 1945 United Nations Conference on International Organization, Szeming Sze, a delegate from China, negotiated with Norwegian and Brazilian delegations about the creation of an international health organization under the auspices of the new United Nations.

After failing to get a resolution passed on the matter, Alger Hiss, general secretary of the conference, recommended using a declaration to establish such an organization. Sze and other delegates lobbied and a declaration was passed calling for an international conference on health. The use of the word "world", rather than "international", emphasizes the truly global nature of what the organization seeks to achieve. 

The Constitution of the World Health Organization was signed by 51 countries of the United Nations, and by 10 other countries, on 22 July 1946. WHO thus became the first specialized agency of the United Nations to which every member participated. Its constitution officially entered into force on the first World Health Day on April 7, 1948, when it was ratified by the 26 member states. 

The first meeting of the World Health Assembly concluded on 24 July 1948, having secured a budget of US$5 million (later £1,250,000) for 1949. G. Brock Chisholm was appointed director general of WHO, having served as executive secretary and founding member during the planning stages , while Andrija slap was the first president of the assembly. 

The first priority is to control the spread of malaria, tuberculosis and sexually transmitted infections, and to improve maternal and child health, nutrition and environmental hygiene. Its first legislative act was about compiling accurate statistics on the spread and morbidity of the disease. The World Health Organization logo features the Rod of Asclepius as a symbol of healing


WHO developments 

At the start of the 21st century, WHO's work involves increasing collaboration with external agencies. In 2002, a total of 473 non-governmental organizations (NGOs) had some form of partnership with WHO. There are 189 partnerships with international NGOs in formal “official relationships” – the rest are considered informal. 

Partners include the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the Rockefeller Foundation. In 2012, the largest annual valuation contributions from member countries came from the United States ($110 million), Japan ($58 million), Germany ($37 million), United Kingdom ($31 million) and France ($31 million).[262] The combined 2012–2013 budget proposes a total expenditure of $3,959 million, of which $944 million (24%) will come from assessed contributions.

This represents a significant reduction in spending compared to the previous 2009–2010 budget, adjusting for prior spending. The assessed contribution remains the same. Voluntary contributions will be up to $3.015 million (76%), of which $800 million is considered highly flexible or moderate funding, with the remainder tied to specific programs or objectives. 

According to The Associated Press, WHO routinely spends around $200 million a year on travel expenses, more than it spends on addressing mental health, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined.


WHO action Related to Covid-19

Pandemic, which has affected millions of people around the world. The organization has been at the forefront of the global response to the pandemic, working to prevent the spread of the virus, to provide guidance to healthcare workers and the public, and to ensure that all countries have access to the tools and resources they need to respond effectively.

One key action that WHO has taken related to COVID-19 is to provide guidance on how to prevent the spread of the virus. This includes recommendations on hand hygiene, wearing masks, physical distancing, and other measures that can help reduce the transmission of the virus. WHO has also developed guidelines for the management of COVID-19 cases, including the use of diagnostic tests and treatments.

Another important action that WHO has taken related to COVID-19 is to support the development and distribution of vaccines. The organization has worked closely with partners around the world to accelerate the development of safe and effective vaccines, and to ensure that all countries have equitable access to them. WHO has also provided guidance on the use of vaccines, including recommendations on prioritizing certain groups for vaccination.

In addition to its work on prevention and treatment, WHO has also played a critical role in addressing the social and economic impacts of the pandemic. The organization has worked with partners to develop guidance on how to safely reopen schools and workplaces, and has provided support to vulnerable populations affected by the pandemic, such as refugees and migrants.

Overall, WHO's actions related to COVID-19 reflect the organization's commitment to promoting and protecting the health of people around the world. With its global reach, expertise, and dedication to public health, WHO is well-positioned to continue working towards ending the COVID-19 pandemic and building a healthier, more resilient world.


WHO contibution to Community

The World Health Organization (WHO) is a specialized agency of the United Nations that is responsible for international public health. The organization plays a crucial role in addressing global health issues and promoting health equity around the world. WHO's contributions to the community are significant and far-reaching, and have a positive impact on people's health and well-being.

One unique aspect of WHO's community contributions is its focus on health equity. The organization recognizes that everyone has the right to good health, regardless of their socio-economic status or geographic location. To this end, WHO works to address the root causes of health disparities, and to promote access to healthcare, medicines, and other health-related services for people in need.

In addition to its focus on health equity, WHO is also committed to preventing and controlling disease outbreaks. The organization has been instrumental in responding to numerous global health emergencies, including the COVID-19 pandemic, and it works closely with governments and other partners to identify and respond to emerging health threats.

WHO's contributions to community health also extend to areas such as nutrition, mental health, and environmental health. The organization works to promote healthy diets and lifestyles, to reduce the burden of mental illness, and to protect communities from the harmful effects of environmental pollutants and hazards.

Overall, WHO's contributions to the community are vast and varied, and reflect the organization's commitment to improving the health and well-being of people around the world. With its global reach, expertise, and commitment to equity and social justice, WHO is well-positioned to continue making a positive impact on public health for years to come

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