List 15 hydroelectric power stations in Mexico

 15 hydroelectric power stations in Mexico

Introduction hydroelectric power stations in Mexico

Mexico has a number of hydroelectric power stations located throughout the country that generate a significant portion of its electricity. 

These power stations have capacities ranging from 14 MW to over 2,400 MW and are located on rivers such as the Grijalva, Balsas, and Santiago. In addition to hydroelectric power, Mexico also has significant potential for wind and solar energy, which are being developed as part of the country's efforts to transition to a more sustainable energy mix.


15 hydroelectric power stations in Mexico

Here are some of the hydroelectric power stations in Mexico:

El Cajón Dam: Located in the state of Nayarit, this hydroelectric power station has a capacity of 750 MW and was completed in 2007.

Manuel Moreno Torres Dam: Also known as Chicoasén, this hydroelectric power station is located on the Grijalva River in the state of Chiapas. It has a capacity of 2,430 MW and is one of the largest hydroelectric power stations in Mexico.

Infiernillo Dam: Located on the Balsas River in the state of Michoacán, this hydroelectric power station has a capacity of 1,200 MW and was completed in 1978.

Francisco J. Múgica Dam: Also known as the Zimapán Dam, this hydroelectric power station is located on the Moctezuma River in the state of Hidalgo. It has a capacity of 1,080 MW and was completed in 1964.

Malpaso Dam: Located on the Grijalva River in the state of Chiapas, this hydroelectric power station has a capacity of 960 MW and was completed in 1980.

El Infiernillo II Dam: Located on the Balsas River in the state of Guerrero, this hydroelectric power station has a capacity of 360 MW and was completed in 2012.

Cerro de Oro Dam: Located on the Grande de Santiago River in the state of Jalisco, this hydroelectric power station has a capacity of 380 MW and was completed in 1976.

La Yesca Dam: Located on the Santiago River in the states of Jalisco and Nayarit, this hydroelectric power station has a capacity of 750 MW and was completed in 2012.

Chilatan Dam: Located on the Atoyac River in the state of Oaxaca, this hydroelectric power station has a capacity of 240 MW and was completed in 2016.

El Gallo Dam: Located on the Tepalcatepec River in the state of Michoacán, this hydroelectric power station has a capacity of 14 MW and was completed in 2013.

El Caracol Dam: Located on the Balsas River in the state of Guerrero, this hydroelectric power station has a capacity of 240 MW and was completed in 2019.

Temascal II Dam: Located on the Papaloapan River in the state of Veracruz, this hydroelectric power station has a capacity of 30 MW and was completed in 2013.

Angostura Dam: Located on the Santiago River in the state of Nayarit, this hydroelectric power station has a capacity of 240 MW and was completed in 2018.

La Parota Dam: Located on the Papagayo River in the state of Guerrero, this hydroelectric power station has a proposed capacity of 900 MW but has not yet been constructed.

Santa María Dam: Located on the Santa María River in the state of Nuevo León, this hydroelectric power station has a capacity of 46 MW and was completed in 2014.

These hydroelectric power stations, along with other sources of renewable energy such as wind and solar, play an important role in Mexico's efforts to reduce its reliance on fossil fuels and combat climate change.


Conclusion 15 hydroelectric power stations in Mexico

Hydroelectric power is a clean and renewable source of energy that is becoming increasingly important in the fight against climate change. 

In Mexico, hydroelectric power stations play a critical role in meeting the country's electricity demand while also reducing its dependence on fossil fuels. These power stations have the capacity to generate large amounts of electricity, which is crucial for Mexico's economic development and improving the quality of life for its citizens. However, the construction of hydroelectric dams also has environmental impacts such as flooding of land and displacement of communities, which needs to be carefully considered and managed. Overall, Mexico's hydroelectric power stations are an important part of the country's energy mix, and as technology improves, it is likely that they will continue to be an increasingly important source of electricity in the years to come.

Hydroelectric power is a vital component of Mexico's energy mix, and the country has invested heavily in developing a network of hydroelectric power stations across the country. These power stations generate significant amounts of electricity, providing a clean and renewable source of energy that is critical to Mexico's economic development and efforts to combat climate change. 

However, it is important to balance the benefits of hydroelectric power with the potential environmental impacts and to ensure that communities impacted by the construction of hydroelectric dams are properly compensated and their concerns are taken into account. As Mexico continues to develop its energy infrastructure, it will be important to pursue a sustainable and equitable energy strategy that prioritizes the well-being of both the environment and the people.

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